The Android Engagement Paradox: Engagement continues to be a struggle despite market share domination

We have heard numerous times that Android users don’t invest in apps like iOS users, and now a new study is showing that Android users aren’t spending as much time purchasing goods through mobile. According to IBM’s Digital Analytics Benchmark, U.S. Black Friday online sales grew by 17.4% over last year, and mobile online sales made up 24% of the traffic. Of this traffic, 13% came from phones and 11% from tablets. In looking at the phone traffic, iOS devices represented about 67% of the traffic, while Android made up roughly 33%. It gets worse with tablets as the iPad represented about 88% of the traffic. What’s even more interesting is that iOS is actually growing at a pretty good rate. Back in 2010, Android represented 1.43% of the Black Friday shopping traffic, and now it’s 4.92%. In looking at iOS, it was 3.85% back in 2010, but now it’s 18.46%.

How is this possible when you consider the growth that Android has enjoyed over the last 2 years? This is what Horace Dediu is calling the “Android Engagement Paradox”. Other than it sounding like the name of a “Big Bang Theory” episode, it appears to be seriously real. Take a look at the images below. The left image shows the growth of Android phones as opposed to the iPhone. The right one shows the percentage of traffic per device.

Two years ago, iPhone users were two times more engaged than Android users and now it’s three times more. Not only that, the percentage of traffic per Android device has dropped. For tablets the results are similar and expected since the iPad has dominated that market for so long.

This is only one area of engagement, but as I mentioned, developers seem to agree when it comes to app purchases as well. So as far a pure device sales, there’s no argument that Android wins, but are Apple devices likely to generate more dollars? Google has recognized Android’s short-comings in this area and made some changes like re-introducing the Android Market as the Play Store and recently they added Google Wallet support for mobile. The real question is why is this paradox happening? Maybe Android’s growth has come from consumers who were unlikely to buy a smartphone, but chose to because of the price was right, and as a result, they aren’t into using it to the fullest extent. Anyone else have any ideas?

source: Asymco

 

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  • Ryo

    I asked on of those statistic companies and they didn’t hesitate to tell me that many Android devices will get count as iOS from their software.

    Apparently they do not decode the complete User-Agent. Some of those analytic tools just look for the Safari/WebKit string and count them toward iOS.

    In addition, some software are not counting Android as either of them, but as unknown and wiped from the statistics.

    That’s the crux. They need to recognize Android properly. A bit mistake in my eyes to send a userstring with “Apple WebKit/Safari” in it.

  • http://MyShocker.com Nudo

    That’s because iOS users tend to be sheepish, they spent a ton on a device so they need to legitimize it by buying equally expensive crap

  • tomhoward

    I assume that iDevice owners just like to spend more, which isn’t all that surprising.

  • kesja

    With Apple, you’re pretty much locked into an ecosystem where you have no choice other than to spend even to increase basic functionality- at that point, you’re basically locked in. alot of which is just standard on AndroId. I sacrificed a lot of locked-in itunes stuff in order to switch from iphone to android.

  • kesja

    With Apple, you’re pretty much locked into an ecosystem where you have no choice other than to spend even to increase basic functionality- at that point, you’re basically locked in. alot of which is just standard on AndroId. I sacrificed a lot of locked-in itunes stuff in order to switch from iphone to android.

  • PKM

    As a android user this pisses me off, I buy my games and apps and I think there is is to much piracy on android, google play has sales all the time and you can eventually get every blockbuster mobile game for 99 cents.

  • El roo

    Are there more people using browsers that present as desktop as browsers as well maybe?

  • Gabor

    iPhone is so much overpriced that people who buy it does not care too much about money. iPhone is $600-$800 it is crazy price for the quality and service compared to Android. Lot of Android users are on tight budget, buy inexpensive phone ($100) and do not spend too much in general.

  • D3Seeker

    Might one also consider all the devices out ther stuck with Gingerbread, with no/questionable custom roms. The issue being how so many new apps and updates require ics and up. Werent the amount of gb devices said to be quite large a few months ago?