Apple seeks to ban the Galaxy Tab in the US (again)

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. This invaluable proverb has been motivating children in the UK for over 200 years now and I was fairly certain that I’d never find a scenario where it doesn’t fit… until now.

In its eternal battle to ban pretty much everything ever invented that doesn’t have an Apple logo on it, Apple hauled Samsung through the US courts last summer with a view to banning the original Galaxy Tab 10.1. Apple’s bid didn’t prove fruitful on that occasion however news from Foss Patents surfaced today suggesting that Apple is back in for a second bite at the cherry and that perhaps this time it might just succeed.

Florian Muller from Foss Patents had the following to say on their website: “Apple’s motion is fairly likely to succeed. If and when it does, there will be formal U.S. bans in place against all three of the leading Android device makers. Also on Friday, the ITC ordered a U.S. import ban against Motorola’s Android-based devices (to the extent those infringe a particular Microsoft patent), and in December, the U.S. trade agency also banned HTC’s products that infringe a particular Apple patent — as a result, two HTC product rollouts just got delayed.”

With Apple and Samsung due in court later in the week with a view to attempting to put an end to this nonsense, this writer will certainly be hoping not to write another article on litigation any time soon. Seriously Apple; save the money for your R&D department, it needs it way more.

 

Source: Foss Patents

» See more articles by Chris Stewart


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  • Emunny05

    F
    U
    C
    K
    Apple.

  • http://www.bestandroidtablets.org/ Andy@BAT

    Can’t we all just get along….. WITHOUT APPLE?!??!!

  • Major_Pita

    I used to work in the Bicyling industry and there was a time when Bell Sports was beset by a torrent of junk lawsuits. They changed their strategy and began to immediately and vigorously counter-sue every case for abuse of the legal system and suddenly their lawsiuit problem was reduced to a trickle. Maybe it’s time to start counter-suing for abuse of the patent system.